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ROSANNE POTTER
IMAGES ABOUT THE ARTIST

potter1

Abstract in sunset, black & blue
Watercolors and ink on paper
12 x 16; 2011

potter2

Abstract in red, green, lavender and yellow
Watercolor on paper
12 x 16; 2012

potter3

Study in Transparencies
Colored pencils, inks, & watercolors
30 x 40; 2013

potter4

Figures emerging, green
India ink and caseins on canvas
18 x 24; 2008


ARTIST STATEMENT

I am a seventy-one year old woman and an amputee for fifty one year. Just before the streetcar accident in Vienna that changed my life, I'd taken a studio art class with American Abstract Expressionist, Clarence Giese. I made a career as a Professor of English and Women's Studies at Iowa State University -- during those years I did not paint. In my retirement, I began participating in a weekly workshop with Jochim Loeber, known as "the last living German Expressionist," in Key West, FL.

My work is primarily abstract and expressionist; I paint representational heads and occasional abstract landscapes. My paintings affiliate with works by Frantisêk Kupka and Francis Picabia. Joe passed these painters' methods along without naming names; in his workshop, they are part of the air we breathe. I see my principle forbears in Der Blaue Reiter -- Wassily Kandinsky, Alexej van Jawlensky, Marianne von Werfkin, Franz Marc, August Mache, and Paul Klee.

I connect to these painters through Edward Munch; Joe met this great Symbolist, Expressionist painter in Berlin, Joe's hometown, where Munch spent many years before he retreated to Norway (where Joe spent WWII). My work is also influenced by Robert Delaunay and Egon Schiele.

The influence of this century of European Abstract Expressionism, non-objective, non-representational painting continues in the American school of Abstract Expressionism, stylistically marked by spontaneous, automatic or subconscious creation in painters from Jackson Pollock to Mark Rothko, Clyfford Still, and Helen Frankenthaler. So though I've not studied this century's art history in a university context, I've absorbed knowledge of these painters through my reading, national and international museum visits, and Joe's workshop. Joe teaches methods and materials. Our work looks like itself, not like the work of Joe's students.

I follow the paint around on the canvas and wait for it to show me figures that emerge; when they emerge, I intensify. I am frequently surprised by my own work -- as I rarely start with the idea that determines what I end with.

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